Types of Blood Cancer: How to Treat Your Patients

Types of Blood Cancer

Blood cancers are cancerous growths that develop in the blood. They’re categorized by where they develop and what type of blood they’re attacking. Knowing the characteristics of each type of blood cancer can help your patients feel more comfortable during their treatment and make decisions about their care. If you’re new to caring for patients with blood cancer, it’s recommended that you attend a series of live online training modules called Pathogenesis and Treatment of Blood Cancers Care Module Training program. These modules will give you an overview of how different types of blood cancers develop and what kinds of treatment options are available to treat them. After you complete these modules, take a quick assessment so we can ensure you meet our training learning goals.

What is blood cancer?

Types of Blood Cancer
Types of Blood Cancer

Blood cancers are tumors that develop in the blood-forming tissue of the human body. They are classified by their location and the type of blood tissue they attack. Most blood cancers start in the blood-forming tissue in the bone marrow, called the hematopoietic system. The hematopoietic system consists of the bone marrow, which produces blood cells, and the spleen, which helps to filter blood and remove old blood cells. A few blood cancers begin in other parts of the body’s blood-forming system. Two kinds of leukemia start in the bone marrow, and one kind of leukemia begins in the lymph nodes. Blood cancers often have specific characteristics that may help your patients feel more comfortable during treatment. For example, some blood cancers cause symptoms that are similar to common conditions, including arthritis or anemia. Others cause symptoms that are similar to autoimmune diseases, such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis. Knowing the characteristics of different blood cancers can help you and your patients make informed decisions about their care.

Red Blood Cell Cancer

In the United States, there are nearly 25,000 new cases of blood cancer annually. This makes it the blood cancer with the second-highest incidence. The most common type of blood cancer is red blood cell cancer. This type of cancer can occur in the blood’s red blood cells, the red blood cell’s membrane, or its hemoglobin. Red blood cell cancers are often deadly, with fewer than 5% of patients surviving five years after diagnosis. They’re often treated with chemotherapy, but some patients are treated with stem cell transplants that aim to restore their bone marrow’s normal function.

White Blood Cell Cancer

White blood cell cancers are often called leukemias. The most common white blood cell cancer is myeloma, which is a type of leukemia that develops in the white blood cells. Less common white blood cell cancers include lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and leukemia of the lymphoid tissue. Most white blood cell cancers are slow-growing and can often be treated with chemotherapy. These cancers usually grow in the bone marrow or in the lymph nodes, and they’re often treated with a procedure called autologous bone marrow transplantation, in which the patient receives a new set of white blood cells from his or her own bone marrow.

Lymphoma

Lymphomas are malignant tumors that develop in the lymph nodes. They’re the third most common blood cancer in the United States, with nearly 10,000 new cases each year. Lymphomas can occur in any part of the lymph system. They often start in one of the lymph nodes, which are small organs that help the body’s immune system protect itself against foreign substances. Lymphomas can also start in other parts of the body’s lymph system, including the spleen, which filters blood. Nearly half of all lymphomas are non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which is the most common type of lymphoma. Most non-Hodgkin lymphomas are slow-growing and can often be treated with chemotherapy. Most Hodgkin lymphomas are aggressive cancers that start in the lymph nodes and may spread to other parts of the body.

Mixed Marrow or Bone Marrow Cancer

In some cases, a blood cancer may start in the bone marrow and then spread to the lymph nodes or spleen. This type of cancer is called mixed marrow or mixed lymphoma. Other cases of mixed marrow or lymphoma begin in the stem cells that are found in the bone marrow, the spleen, or other parts of the blood-forming system. The most common type of mixed marrow or lymphoma. Other mixed marrow or lymphoma types include leukemia and myeloma. The prognosis for mixed marrow and lymphoma is also mixed, with some blood cancers having a better prognosis than others.

Summary

Blood cancers are caused by abnormal cell growth in the blood-forming tissue. They can affect red blood cells, white blood cells, or lymph nodes. The five most common blood cancers are: – Red blood cell cancer – The most common type of blood cancer – Hematopoietic cell sarcoma – White blood cell cancer – Leukemia – Lymphoma – Mixed marrow or bone marrow cancer – Myeloma – Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Blood cancers can have different characteristics that can help your patients feel more comfortable during treatment. For example, some blood cancers cause symptoms that are similar to common conditions, such as anemia or arthritis. Others cause symptoms that are similar to autoimmune diseases, such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis. Knowing the characteristics of different blood cancers can help you and your patients make informed decisions about their care.

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